The Secret Purpose of Magic

I’m going to spare you the labor of kneeling before a mystic guru for decades, joining secret societies and putting up with their drama, and quite possibly reincarnating a few thousand times in order to learn this nugget of wisdom.

I’m cheating slightly by letting you in on the secret, but I’ve been known to bend the rules before.

The process of attaining proficiency in magic is traumatic and shocking. For some, their brains came out wrong at birth and the psychic censor works horribly. Others take strange drugs. Some experience physical traumas, like being struck by lightning or being hit by speeding vehicles. A few have near-death experiences and come back changed. Others put themselves through exteme mental contortions that for variable periods render the initiate batshit insane.

You can’t think like a normal human being, a descendant of mutated apes, and do superhuman things. So under most circumstances your mind– and by extension your spirit– has to change. A lot.

It’s about plasticity. Spiritual plasticity mirroring the neuroplasticity; as above so below. Every time a magician alters their mental state past the breaking point, it’s like having a stroke. After the shock to the system subsides, the magician has to mend and rewire their consciousness like a person learning to walk after a brain injury. This happens over and over and in numerous ways. New abilities and strangeness are acquired along the road.

It’s also about strength. You need to damage muscles through strain in order to rebuild them stronger. The most basic lesson of athleticism.

That plasticity and strength are not for their own sakes, however.

It’s to prepare us for retaining our memories and personality through the death process. Brain death is almost exactly like having thousands of strokes all at once. Instead of oxygen being cut off from one part of the brain and killing a portion, oxygen is cut off from the entire. This is the most extreme trauma a person can experience without uncommon supernatural intervention.

Most people lose their internal coherence at some point after death. It’s no secret that ghostly spirits do not think or behave quite like living people, and some appear to have lost memories and attributes while whooshing about the eerie void. Yet they retain enough that when called up by various means, they have knowledge that only those particular people could possess. In many instances the contact is with an echo of a person or even a trickster spirit, but in others it appears to be a forgetful and confused version of a discarnate human being. (Though sometimes they’re just faking confusion– but that’s a whole different topic.)

When people transmigrate –and I suspect that is a real phenomenon if it doesn’t necessarily happen to everyone– the process of embedding spirit in flesh is similarly disorienting and traumatic. The result is that hardly anyone is born retaining clear memories of their former lives, of spiritual realms– and one’s personality also changes in various ways.

People who have trained themselves to recover from dramatic changes in consciousness, shock, and systemic injury eventually can break that cycle and retain a clear mind, memory, and a stable personality whether they choose to remain in the spiritual realms or return to corporeal existence.

Magic helps us solve problems in many ways. But many things exist which can solve most of those problems which don’t require such extreme and unusual activities. What makes magic unique is that it gradually (and often very uncomfortably) prepares us for a more advanced existence as a spirit.

On Scholastic Image Magic

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Scholastic Image Magic or SIM was one of two main branches of magical practice in the Medieval Era and the Renaissance. It was heavily influenced by the science of the Arabic world, and incorporated astrology, optics, mathematics, and the philosophy of antiquity. The European version was an outgrowth of Medieval Scholasticism; a movement which attempted to reconcile Christianity with the works of Plato, Aristotle and the mystical Neoplatonists.

Scholastic Image Magic focuses primarily upon the creation of talismans; objects created or modified to become repositories of celestial light which alter the attributes and destinies and basic nature of anything in their proximity, including human beings.

It also includes celestial petitions, which are akin to highly ritualized prayers which facilitate the granting of expressed wishes. This is where Scholastic Image Magic and theurgy, the other main branch, cross over.

(The other branch is also sometimes called necromancy, depending on emphasis. It largely focuses on angel magic and spirit evocation, and use of Biblical charms and sometimes variants of Kabbalah. There is significant overlap, but the rationales for these traditions are different at heart.)

Both the creation of talismans and the making of petitions are endowed power largely through astrological timing. Some have asserted that Scholastic Image Magic is a subcategory of Electional Astrology, the choosing of fortunate times. It certainly is dependent upon it; but I and others believe in the importance of the materials used as well. There is no way to become minimally competent in this tradition of magic without being very skilled in Medieval or Renaissance Era Astrology.

Scholastic Image Magic may also include the creation of confections, suffumigations (incenses), and potions; though these are often considered to be alchemy.

Many of us who have experimented with Scholastic Image Magic believe it to be the most powerful (and sometimes dangerous) form of magic in Western history. The demands usually exceed those of other magical traditions in numerous ways, and the results are proportional. It is not for the dilettante. Many of us have studied under Christopher Warnock, whose RenaissanceAstrology.com is a great place to learn a major flavor of this from tabula rasa. Without having some background in the generalities of Traditional Astrology you’ll probably be very confused. John Michael Greer often describes this stuff as the rocket science of the Middle Ages. (And he should know, because he translated Picatrix with Christopher Warnock a few years back.)

Scholastic Image Magic has a body of literature which we refer to frequently. The most central text is the Picatrix, which has two popular editions at present. Another, harder to find text is the Treasure of Alexander. Cornelius Agrippa’s Three Books on Occult Philosophy (especially the upcoming complete Eric Purdue translation) is an excellent source for Scholastic Image Magic and much else besides, and large portions of the somewhat derivative The Magus from Francis Barrett are appropriate. Though the available version of De Imaginibus is purged of suffumigation recipes and incantations, it is still of great value. I find the Liber Lunae to be very fascinating, and has had an influence on Kabbalah. The Mysterium Sigillorum and the Kyranides have content of interest. Many shorter texts such as the Quindecim Stellis and De Mineralibus, Seals & Stones of Solomon, Seals & Sigils of Chael, Talismans of Hermes, and the Seals of Thetel are also very important, and sections of the works of Giordano Bruno and even parts of the so-called Greater Key of Solomon merit study. But all of this is built upon a foundation of antique astrology and metaphysics, such as the essential writers Guido Bonatti, Johannes Sacrobosco, and Abu Yusuf Al-Kindi, which the authors expected the readers to have expertise in.

I have studied and practiced Scholastic Image Magic in a very focused way for over a decade, I have witnessed it cure incurable diseases, draw hundreds of thousands of dollars from nowhere, conjure storms, raise and banish spirits, repel dangerous animals, hypnotize and compel obedience, and make a subject fall hopelessly in love. In my own experience it is vastly closer to the kind of magic which appears in myths and Fantasy literature than anything else I’ve seen. (And I have expertise in many other traditions of magic, which have their own distinctive advantages.)

If this tickles your fancy and you’re considering putting in the effort, welcome aboard. SIM is one of my very favorite flavors of magic. If it isn’t your cup of tea, there’s a lot of additional material on my blog to inform and tantalize.

picatrix-miracles

The Age of Black Magic: Step Three

Manufacture large amounts of Dead Water.

If you don’t have an ancestral altar, I can recommend the following book: https://smile.amazon.com/gp/product/1413484379/

While some are not naturals with regards to necromantic sorcery, lots of people put out offerings like candles, candies and water for their deceased relatives. You will need some version of this for several steps forthcoming, so that’s something you want to set up right away. (Some of you may have had ancestors who who were soldiers or patriots or politicians, or simply people who would have found the Trump Dynasty objectionable. Objects belonging to them or pictures of them may be of uncommon value in this instance.)

When spirits visit the altar space and feed upon the offerings, they actually absorb the life-giving properties from them and what’s left over is a kind of sponge for luck and vitality, primed to restore that equilibrium from anything they touch.

It looks like normal water, but it’s a magical poison.

Which is why you normally throw away that stuff after about a week, and any spillage has to be cleaned up with Florida Water or something similar.

Or, you can concentrate that stuff by letting it evaporate in pans, then stored in glass bottles, and eventually loaded into spring water bottles or squirt guns, and used as a weapon on relics, people or buildings. Or you can trick rotten people to drink it, or boil food in it.

I call this stuff Dead Water or Anti-Water.

It’s not nearly as strong as Seven Suicide Soil, but a lot easier to manufacture. And it just looks like ordinary water, so it’s sneaky. So, get going on that.

The Age of Black Magic: Step One

Obtain dirt from the graves of seven young people who have committed suicide because of the election of Donald Trump.

In combination this material will be one of the most powerful weapons in your arsenal. These restless spirits will be your shock troops. They will be eager to work for you, against the administration especially.

One can substitute crematory ashes, or soil from those who have died as a consequence of the administration’s policies.

Put the kids to work; pay their graves. They are not your interns.

I list this first because it is a difficult project and may take years and collaboration to accomplish.

A Presaging of Death

The prediction of the death of a female I (or my mother) was connected to at 10am has been verified as fact, though my interpretation was slightly off.

The prognostication was based on a very vivid dream involving my mother taking a friend of hers on a women-only resort retreat via taxi “up the mountain” at 10am the following day. I was told that I could not join them on this ride, but perhaps someday I’d go up to that snowy peak in their company. I then took a different taxi home, and promptly awakened.

There were several elements of the dream which seemed to reference a horror film my mother fixated upon (that I am not even sure I’ve seen) which involved people dreaming of being invited for a ride into a hearse shortly before dying. Since this was her fixation and not mine I took it as a sign of a real message from her; a kind of deliberate identity-verification thrown into the mix. Not the mention bashing me over the head about how the dream was to be interpreted.

The dream did not seem in any way sinister until I awakened and I began to connect the dots and interpret the symbolism with a waking mind. It seemed obvious that a woman who was friends with me or my mother was doomed to die the next day at 10. But this was not quite the correct interpretation.

The elder sister of a person with whom I have a close and friendly business relationship has been suffering from cancer for the last several months. This sister helped me clean out my home after my mother’s surviving cats were taken to a Connecticut cat sanctuary, and she was an amateur tarot reader and we bonded on that level. I would see her once or twice a year and we were on amicable if not always close terms.

Once I had heard that she was ill, I loaned her my mother’s Saturn talisman because of its ability to prevent cancer. I had no idea at the time whether it could cure cancer once it had been diagnosed but it was all I had at hand that seemed vaguely appropriate.

Yesterday I spoke with the younger sibling, and was told that the Saturn talisman would shortly be returned to me. The sister’s cancer had metastasized into ten brain tumors and she was not long for this world. Any further work the talisman might do would only cause her to linger unhappily.

So, my interpretation was correct in all ways except that the “ride up the mountain” was not to take place literally at 10AM the next day but by the medium of ten malignant brain tumors. (It is possible that AM is a reference to astrocytoma, but that may be a bit of a stretch.)

As I have discovered previously, SIM talismans used by people who are deceased can be extremely powerful ways to connect to their spirits in the afterlife and open remarkably powerful communications.

Interpreting messages from the spirit world is always a challenge, and I cannot fault myself greatly for getting this one slightly wrong. There was nothing I could do about it in any case. This message was not meant to alter events, but was simply a reminder that the communication channel was open and available.

The Debts We Owe to the Dead

When I pay homage to the ancestors, I add the names of practitioners of magic whom I have known but are no longer among the living.

Most of them got that way because they did some inadvisable magic— in my estimation, at least.

One of the debts we owe to the dead is not to make their mistakes. Otherwise, their sacrifices will have been entirely in vain.

Ancient Stellar Magic and the Rings of Power @ ConVocation 2011

 

Clifford Hartleigh Low’s lecture on “Ancient Stellar Magic and the Rings of Power” at ConVocation 2011. This lecture covers Traditional Astrology, Stellar Omens, Zoroastrianism, the Liber Hermetis, the Behenian Fixed Stars, Talismans, Magical Rings and Crowns, Predestination, Symmetrical Divinatory Systems, Astral Light, Servitors, Stellar Hierarchies, Petitions, and much much more…